9. Wie heißen Sie?

(at work)

Georg: Guten Tag. Mein Name ist Georg López. Wie heißen Sie?

Hr. Müller (schüttelt seine Hand): Hallo. Mein Name ist Müller. Freut mich.

Georg: Es freut mich Sie kennenzulernen, Herr Müller.

Hr. Müller: Sind Sie der neue Praktikant, Herr López?

Georg: Ja, ich mache für drei Monate ein Praktikum bei Ihnen.

Hr. Müller: Schön. Herzlich willkommen.

Georg: Danke schön.

Hr. Müller: Woher kommen Sie? Sie kommen aus Spanien, oder?

Georg: Ja, ich lebe seit sechs Monaten in Deutschland.

Fr. Schmidt: Entschuldigen Sie. Herr Müller, der Chef möchte, dass Sie in sein Büro kommen.

Hr. Müller: Sofort. Auf Wiedersehen, Herr López.

Show text

Georg: Guten Tag. Mein Name ist Georg López. Wie heißen Sie?

Hr. Müller (schüttelt seine Hand): Hallo. Mein Name ist Müller. Freut mich.

Georg: Es freut mich Sie kennenzulernen, Herr Müller.

Hr. Müller: Sind Sie der neue Praktikant, Herr López?

Georg: Ja, ich mache für drei Monate ein Praktikum bei Ihnen.

Hr. Müller: Schön. Herzlich willkommen.

Georg: Danke schön.

Hr. Müller: Woher kommen Sie? Sie kommen aus Spanien, oder?

Georg: Ja, ich lebe seit sechs Monaten in Deutschland.

Fr. Schmidt: Entschuldigen Sie. Herr Müller, der Chef möchte, dass Sie in sein Büro kommen.

Hr. Müller: Sofort. Auf Wiedersehen, Herr López.

Georg: Hello. My name is Georg López. What is your name?

Mr. Müller (shakes his hand): Hello. My name is Müller. Nice to meet you.

Georg: Nice to meet you, Mr. Müller.

Mr. Müller: Are you the new intern, Mr. López?

Georg: Yes, I’m doing an internship at your company (lit. “at you”) for three months.

Mr. Müller: I understand. Welcome.

Georg: Thank you.

Mr. Müller: Where are you from? You’re from Spain, right?

Georg: Yes, I’ve been living in Germany for six months.

Mrs. Schmidt: Excuse me. Mr. Müller, the boss wants you to come to his office.

Mr. Müller: Right away. Goodbye, Mr. López.

Show translation

Wie heißen Sie? (2)

(the next day)

Fr. Schmidt: Guten Morgen, Herr López.

Georg: Guten Morgen, Frau Schmidt.

Fr. Schmidt: Wie geht es Ihnen?

Georg: Sehr gut, und Ihnen?

Fr. Schmidt: Gut, viel zu tun. Wie immer.

Hr. Müller: Entschuldigen Sie, Frau Schmidt, Herr López. Wissen Sie, wo der Chef ist?

Georg: Nein, tut mir leid.

Fr. Schmidt: Er hat gerade einen Termin. Er kommt in circa einer Stunde wieder ins Büro.

Hr. Müller: Wenn Sie ihn sehen, sagen Sie ihm bitte, dass ich Ihn suche

Georg: Natürlich.

Fr. Schmidt: In Ordnung.

Show text

Fr. Schmidt: Guten Morgen, Herr López.

Georg: Guten Morgen, Frau Schmidt.

Fr. Schmidt: Wie geht es Ihnen?

Georg: Sehr gut, und Ihnen?

Fr. Schmidt: Gut, viel zu tun. Wie immer.

Hr. Müller: Entschuldigen Sie, Frau Schmidt, Herr López. Wissen Sie, wo der Chef ist?

Georg: Nein, tut mir leid.

Fr. Schmidt: Er hat gerade einen Termin. Er kommt in circa einer Stunde wieder ins Büro.

Hr. Müller: Wenn Sie ihn sehen, sagen Sie ihm bitte, dass ich Ihn suche

Georg: Natürlich.

Fr. Schmidt: In Ordnung.

Mrs. Schmidt: Good morning Mr. López.

Georg: Good morning, Mrs. Schmidt.

Mrs. Schmidt: How are you?

Georg: Great, and you?

Mrs. Schmidt: I’m fine, a lot to do. As always.

Mr. Müller: Excuse me, Ms. Schmidt, Mr. López. Do you know where the boss is?

Georg: No, I’m sorry.

Mrs. Schmidt: He has an appointment right now. He’ll be back in the office in about an hour.

Mr. Müller: Please tell him that I am looking for him when you see him.

Georg: Of course.

Mrs. Schmidt: All right.

Show translation

Wie heißen Sie (3) – ein paar nützliche Sätze

Ein paar nützliche Sätze

Was ist los?

Das wird schon.

Es kommt darauf an.

Ist mir egal.

Wie sieht es aus?

Wie sieht es morgen aus?            

Das dauert ewig.

Show text

Ein paar nützliche Sätze

Was ist los?

Das wird schon.

Es kommt darauf an.

Ist mir egal.

Wie sieht es aus?

Wie sieht es morgen aus?

Das dauert ewig.

A few useful sentences

What’s going on (surprised)?

It will be alright.

It depends.

I don’t care.

How are things? (lit. “How does it look like?”)

How about tomorrow?

That’s taking ages. (lit. “That lasts eternally”)

Show translation

Höflichkeitsform Sie (polite form Sie)

In German, you use Sie (with a capital s!) to address people in a polite way. It is used for talking to one or more than one person, corresponding to the Spanish usted/ustedes and the French vous. In general, if you don’t know someone, you should address them using Sie unless you are talking to children. But this also depends on the context. If it’s less formal, like at a party or sports club, people usually use du. Younger people, around the age of 27 (give or take a few years), also tend to use du with others their own age.

Get yourself a teacher

Are you taking any German lessons? If not, we strongly recommend you to. While doing this course will lay a solid foundation for your German, you’ll reach your full potential only by taking additional lessons with a teacher. TAre you taking any German lessons? If not, we highly recommend you do. This course will help lay a solid foundation for your German, but you’ll really only reach your full potential by taking additional lessons with a teacher. And these days, that’s easier than ever. You don’t have to be to living in Germany or pay loads of money. On platforms like italki, you can choose from over 300 native German speakers with plenty of teaching experience. Having a teacher is so important because you need to practice speaking the language you’re learning. If you have German speaking friends, you can practice with them of course but if you’re a beginner, you’ll often find yourself switching to English. A teacher however, will always encourage you to speak German and also correct your mistakes. Plus, your teacher can tailor your lessons to your specific needs. So what are you waiting for? Take your German to the next level and book a trial lesson!

Number of Anki cards: 34 (1. text: 15, 2. text: 12, 3. text: 7)

Go to lesson 10 >>

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *